The 2019 Penprints Flash Fiction Dash Wrap-up

Today is the wrap-up for the 2019 Penprints Flash Fiction Dash!

We had 39 sign-ups this year, but sadly 17 of our writers were unable to complete the challenge due to lots of crazy life stuff (heck, I wasn’t even technically participating in the challenge and had a hard time tending to it this year).

But we still have over twenty stories in eight different genres (I’m using that term loosely, haha), and they’re all gathered here for your reading pleasure!

Disclaimer: I own none of the prompts.

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[Contemporary]

[prompt: Younger Now by Miley Cyrus]

Gray by Abigayle Claire.

These Moments... by Micaiah Saldaña.

Symphony of Change by Andi L. Gregory.


 

[Urban Fantasy/Magical Realism]

urban fantasy

Monster Mayhem by Anika Walkes (pg-13 content warning).

War by Just B. Jordan.


 

[Fairytale/Folklore]

fairytale

Home Before Dark by Spruce Holly Nogard.

Lisanthus by Emily Jayne.

Moonlit Dances by M.A. Starr.


 

[Sword and Sorcery]

sword and sorcery

The Chosen One by Julian Daventry.

The Burden of Remembrance by Sarah Rodecker.

Ferra by Alina Kanaski.

Remember by R. M. Archer.


 

[Dystopian]

dystopian prompt

Level 1 by Lila Kims (it’s really a light sci-fi story, but shhhhh).

Lupe by Nicholas Jayne (pg-13 content warning).


[Cyberpunk]

[prompt: Arrow by half-alive]

The Hardest Place by Carrie-Anne Thomas.

Between Remembered and Forgotten by T. J. Priest.

The Chainless by J. M. Jablowski.


[Superhero]

superhero prompt

The Inferno by Nicole Dust.

Pirouette by C.O. Bonham.


[Romance]

[prompt: Be Here Long by NEEDTOBREATHE]

Her Hair Is Red by Laura Frances.

Jesus Has a Plan by Farmgirl Fibers and Arts.


And that’s a wrap!

Dashers, keep an eye on your inbox for a debrief email!

Which story was your favorite? Which prompt was your favorite? Should we have another flash fic dash next year?

With love,

Rosalie

How To Do Something You’ve Never Done Before

Have you ever felt the urge to try something that you’ve never done before?

Maybe you’ve never skateboarded a meter in your life, but you want to try it so bad. Or maybe you’ve never held a guitar or any instrument before, never written a line of poetry either, but an itch starts to grow, an itch to write songs because there are things you’ve seen God do that you want to proclaim. Or maybe coding is starting to sound really appealing, but you don’t have a background in HTML or even computer science. Or maybe you want to garden and grow stuff but you don’t know the first thing about green things.

It’s not something you want to make a living off of, but it’s something you desire to do, something you want to try, if only for a little while.

Does it feel hard? Does it feel like you’re too old to start something like that, like if you wanted to get into storytelling, you should have done it when you were seven, and since you’re thirty-seven or seventy-seven, you’ve missed the window of opportunity?

Does it feel like you’re foolish for wanting to break out of your current skill set? Are you worried that people would wrinkle their noses at you and ask, “Why do you want to do that? You’ve never done anything like that before.”

So instead of feeling excited, you feel almost guilty for wanting more, for wanting to do something different, something new.

This, my friend, is for you.

how to do something youve never done before

So how do you do something that you’ve never done before?

How do you write songs when you’ve never played with poetry a day in your life?

How do you start writing stories when your creativity has looked vastly different all your life?

How do you start painting when you know nothing about color theory or what the different brushes are for?

How do you start a daily comic when your drawing skills haven’t been cultivated since kindergarten?

How do you do anything you’ve never done before?

Just start doing it.

Start by just doing it, even if you feel like you’ve got no idea what you’re doing, because honestly, even if you keep this up for ten more years, you’ll probably still feel like you’ve got no idea what you’re doing (feeling like I have no idea what I’m doing is the plane of existence that I live on, friends).

So start by actually starting. Do it right now or put it on the calendar for some time in the next week that you will start and do whatever it is for at least twenty minutes. Even if you don’t know where to start, you can still start (trust me, I know).

When you’re able to, read blog posts about it, watch YouTube tutorials about it, talk to people you know have experience in it, maybe take a class, and keep starting.

Keep starting.

In the beginning, put it in your to-do list one to three times a week for twenty minute increments as a starting point.

That consistency, that repeated stomping fear in the throat, and simply doing it strengthens your muscles (these are metaphorical muscles, unless the thing you’re starting is some sort of workout insanity; then it will actually strengthen your literal muscles).

Don’t overthink it.

Just don’t. You don’t have to make a big deal out of it. You can tell people if you want. You don’t have to, though.

One day, this thing that you’re starting today may be a big deal, something hugely integral in your life. But for now, for today, it’s a seed, a spark, an inkling. Let it be a little thing. Don’t overthink it.

Don’t expect too much of yourself.

This sounds bad, but it isn’t. Have realistic expectations. Don’t put the expectation on yourself that you have to be great at it right out of the gate.

Build a dam against perfectionism starting right now.

Don’t feel like you have to share it.

I am a huge believer in sharing our gifts. But I also think there’s special beauty and freedom, especially in the beginning of something, for it to be private, shared with God only or maybe a select few.

If you want to share it, share it! But if this little adventure only ever stays between you and God, that’s okay too. It doesn’t have to tangibly affect something or someone; there are many seemingly intangible and unquantifiable “results” that it brings out in you that are more than enough to make it worthwhile.

Also, privacy, especially in the beginning, frees you up to have a lot more fun without other people’s expectations (along with your own) breathing down your neck.

Have fun.

Seriously. Have. some. fun.

Have some fun! Unharness yourself from expectation and enjoy creating or skateboarding or doing whatever it is you’re doing.

It is okay to do things just for the fun of it. I’ll say it again: it is okay to do things just for the fun of it. The fun of it can glorify God.

Practice and persevere before giving up.

Don’t do something once and decide you’re awful at it. Practice. Keep starting for six months before you give up.

I say six months because it is enough time for your skills to sharpen drastically, but it’s also enough time for you to cycle through the various imposter syndromes, hating it, loving it, honeymooning with it, etc.

By the end of those six months, if you hate it or even are just meh, feel free to throw in the towel. Don’t ever think that just because you start something you have to do it for the rest of your life. Maybe you will. Maybe you won’t.

Seek God.

Honestly, do this the entire time, but I put it near the end because I don’t want you to get the impression that seeking God for this is going to involve praying and fasting and a moment of clarity and weeping when you think you’ve got the green light from him. I put it at the end because I don’t want you to overthink this (think about it, but don’t overthink about it [have fun finding that balance {also, notice how overthinking is a theme}]).

Just keep talking to God about it. He knows the interest in this thing has been stirring in you (it could be that he’s been the one stirring it up) but tell him anyway. Confess to him why you’re scared to start and all the things you’re overthinking about it (because you’re probably overthinking about it).

Then, submit it to him. Submit your desires to God.

Then, test it. AKA: start!

Again, at this point, this new thing isn’t a big deal, so don’t overthink it. Just start and see what God does.

Just because you started and stopped something now doesn’t mean you’ll never start it again.

If it “flops” now (aka: you’re not loving it, and it becomes clear that this isn’t the time for this adventure), just know that you don’t have to feel foolish or sheepish if six months or six years or six decades down the road you want to try again.

Honestly, when it’s the right time, the right season of life, when this new thing will accomplish the most good (remember, good doesn’t have to be tangible or concrete), then God will make sure you don’t drop it. Seriously, he won’t let you drop it until it’s the best for you and most glorifying for him for you to do so. Or maybe it’ll be best and most glorifying for you to never drop it. *shrug* I guess you’ll just have to find out.

There you have it.

Now you know how to do something you’ve never done before. While writing this post, I had mostly artsy/creative things in my head, but I think this advice goes for most things—running, mountain climbing, carpentry, steel fabrication, surfing, scrapbooking, etc.

What is something new you’ve wanted to try for a while but haven’t? Why not?

With love,

Rosalie

p.s. – Olive Tree (you know who you are), this post is for you, precious one. Go write that music.

p.p.s. – I feel like I said “honestly” and “just” way too much in this post, but I don’t even care because this post was definitely a we’re-sitting-across-from-each-other-at-a-coffee-shop-and-I’m-going-to-encourage-you-to-try-the-thing type of post (aka: remarkably informal, lacking only gifs).

What Keeps Me Writing

With my move to Texas, a lot has been thrown up in the air, and I’ve spent a lot of time frantically glancing at God and asking which things I’m supposed to catch and which I’m supposed to let fall out of my life, at least for now.

Of course, writing has been one of the things I’ve been wondering if it should stay or go, and I keep asking myself, “Why doesn’t the urge to write just die off? Why do I keep writing?”

what keeps me writing

I.

I cannot remember a time before I wrote. Yes, there was obviously a time before I could read and write, but I don’t remember it.

While that instinct to write comes very naturally, the writing itself is hard. It’s hard to wrangle a plot when it often seems like I don’t have a single plotting bone in my body. It’s hard to rewrite and rewrite and rewrite until it comes out right. It’s hard to make the time and muster up the motivation when I’m not feeling inspired (which, by the way, is most of the time).

But I keep coming back to it. What brings me back to it?

II.

I no longer find my identity in being a writer or storyteller—that was one of t things that used to compel me to write. I didn’t know who I was if I wasn’t a writer.

Now, I know that I’m Rosalie, a redeemed slave of God, a part of the bride of Christ. That is my identity, not writing.

With the death of my misplaced identity came a great sense of relief and freedom. It’s okay if I don’t write. It’s okay if I don’t tell stories. They don’t define me, don’t bring meaning to my life.

So what keeps me writing?

III.

One of my dearest friends has entered a season of her life when she isn’t writing anymore, and it feels strange to me to be writing without her, like something’s missing.

But why do I still do it?

IV.

It took me a long time to understand that my writing honors God. As a child of a culture addicted to functionality, I fretted over whether my writing could actually serve a purpose—especially storytelling, my native tongue.

Slowly, painfully, I’ve learned that my writing—my blog, my stories, etc.—doesn’t need to serve a practical, functional purpose.

It can, but it doesn’t need to in order to be valuable or honoring to God. God is glorified in my simple enjoyment in creating, and God is also glorified in my dedication to keep creating when it is less than fun.

My writing doesn’t have to “do” anything else.

I look around at this earth, this planet we’re richly blessed to live on. It doesn’t need all these colors. It doesn’t need all these wondrous creatures. It doesn’t need all these scents or these sounds. It doesn’t need all this beauty, this beauty that doesn’t do anything, that just is.

But aren’t there better things I could do with my time? Why do I keep coming back to writing and art?

V.

Last week I walked to the nearest coffee shop with a notebook tucked in my purse. I ordered a tasty coffee drink in the largest size and picked my spot. I breathed in a moment, whispering to God about an idea only two days old, and then I breathed out a story.

My mind was completely immersed in images and sensations, tangling with words and metaphors, forgetting fear, following the ebb and flow of the story. And I just wrote. And wrote. And wrote. And wrote. For hours. And as I wrote, confusion fled and healing for many things was finished as the ink dried on the pages. It was good. It was joyful.

Why did I spend hours in a coffee shop, drenched in words, writing a story?

VI.

I’ve gotten a lot of clarity about why I still write, hard as it is. There are many reasons, some solid and quantifiable, others more unmeasurable and more difficult to define (but no less real).

I keep writing because writing forces me to grow. It requires dedication. It requires consistency. It requires perseverance. It requires throwing off fear. It requires exploration and risk. It requires patience. It requires trying and failing.

What keeps me writing?

The thrill of creation, of building worlds from the ground up with sheer imagination. The discovery of new characters and personalities and journeys. The way that stories have impacted me, made me into who I am today much like friends. The awe and wonder that stories and storytelling calls out in my blood. The healing I’ve experienced through the act of telling stories. The knowledge that my creativity is a wonderful gift. The delight that my creativity is a special way I get to image Christ.

What keeps me writing?

Knowing I was designed for this—to write. Knowing I was designed to tell stories. Knowing it is a gift I’ve been given to help me make sense of life, to bring healing to completion, to have my imagination redeemed for good things, to enjoy God more, to grow in wonder, to endure and persevere, to see beauty ignite out of ashes.

VII.

I used to think that my writing was God’s gift to the world (yikes, I know). Now, I know that it is one of God’s gifts to me, for my personal good in so many ways, a gift I am privileged to sometimes share with the world.

VIII.

I’m incredibly proud of my creativity, not because it came from me or I worked for it or anything like that, but because I get to use it.

There was a time when I would have been to afraid to write that previous sentence because I feared my own pride so much that I couldn’t have simple confidence and delight in the gifts I’ve been given. I would have been afraid of people thinking I’m conceited.

I’m not afraid of that anymore. At least not about this.

So I’ll say it again: I’m incredibly proud of my creativity and my writing. I’m proud because I am creative in the image Christ. I’m proud because I know that everyone is built to reflect of image of Christ in a unique way, and I’m privileged and honored and humbled and proud and delighted to reflect God in this way: writing and creativity.

I hope I do it with right confidence and boldness all the days of my life.

IX.

I don’t know what this post is supposed to be. Don’t ask me what the Roman numerals are doing besides providing dividers between threads of thought that for some reason belong in this post but couldn’t flow together naturally.

This is, I suppose, more of a journal entry than anything else, an expression of what’s been cycling through my mind and heart… but also a revel in this way God has built me, for my good and his glory.

Thanks for reading. I hope it made sense (yikes).

With love,

Rosalie

p.s. – I seriously hope this post makes sense.

p.p.s. – I’ve written posts about why I write before, but I’ve been ruminating over it a lot (again), and I figured it’s never the wrong time for existential musings.

p.p.p.s. – I have this niggling feeling like there’s a typo (or seven) hiding out in this post, but they are invisible to my eyes. So, sorry about that. ;)

Why Dracula [a review/journal entry about why I (surprisingly) love Dracula by Bram Stoker]

If you’ve been around Penprints any time since October 2018, you’ve probably seen my frequent references to Dracula and how much I love it and want to write Dracula fan fiction and wear all the Storiarts Dracula merch etc. etc. etc.. Well, today a little background into why I love it so much.

I’m not sure what compelled me to use one of my precious Audible credits to purchase an audiobook version of Dracula by Bram Stoker.

While I’ve always loved science fiction and fantasy and most else that can be classified as “weird”, I’ve had an aversion to the horror genre (a post for another time, perhaps?). I’ve never caught the vampire craze, and I have a tenuous relationship with most pieces of classic literature.

So why’d I decide to listen to Dracula—vampire novel, predecessor of the horror genre, piece of classic literature?

I still don’t know. But listen to it I did, expecting not to like it, expecting I’d not even finish it, and instead found I love it. So much so that when I visited Barnes and Noble last Tuesday, I bought a red leather copy to keep in my personal library.

So here’s a review/journal entry to explain some of why I so enjoyed Dracula. Maybe it’ll intrigue you into reading this classic.

why dracula

[Brief Blurb]

Jonathan Harker, a young English lawyer, travels through the Eastern European country of Transylvania to conclude a real estate transaction with a nobleman. As Harker wends his way through the picturesque countryside, the local peasants react with terror when he tells them his destination: Castle Dracula.

Upon arriving at the crumbling old castle, Harker finds that the elderly Dracula is a well-educated and hospitable gentleman. But after only a few days, Harker realizes that he is effectively a prisoner in the castle, and as he investigates the nature of his confinement, he realizes that the count possesses supernatural powers and murderous ambitions.

Told from the perspective of multiple narrators, Dracula recounts a group of ordinary people who uncover the count’s plot and seek to stop him at any cost.

(Blurb adapted from sparknotes.com.)

[The Format]

The first thing to strike me about Dracula is its format: a collection of newspaper clippings, ships logs, letters, and personal diaries. And that style of storytelling is incredibly appealing to me

Each piece of writing—be it a telegram, ship log, journal entry, etc.—pertains in some way to the overarching plot surrounding Count Dracula. While the reader sees correspondence and reflections from almost a dozen different sources, we primarily get to know three narrators in particular: Jonathon Harker, Mina Murry, and Dr. John Seward, which brings us to the next thing I loved…

[The Characters]

Um, I loved them all.

Well, mainly Jonathan Harker, Mina Murray, Dr. Seward, and Dr. Van Helsing. But the rest were also endearing.

They loved each other so much and were so passionate in their affections and admiration for each other and all that is good that I just have to smile whenever I think about them. (More on them when we get to the themes.)

[The Themes]

Amity, modernity the nature of goodness, and the nature of evil were some of my favorite themes from Dracula.

Modernity.

Victorian era London (where the main characters are from) was one of the peaks of modern enlightenment and science. I found it very interesting how that modernity failed in the fight against Count Dracula. The heroes had to suspend what science told them, what their enlightened minds could understand, in order to go after Count Dracula. Instead of science, they were forced to embrace that which would be scoffed at as mere superstition. Their modern intellect and rationality were forced to give way to that which cannot be explained.

I believe this is especially thought provoking in today’s modern world. We get so comfortable in our flesh and bone, in the brief moment of time we live on this earth, in the science that’s integrated into every aspect of our lives. We think we’re so logical, enlightened, modern, scientific, and knowledgeable—too proud (or maybe too afraid) to embrace what we can’t see or don’t understand, which, for the Christian, has frightening implications when it comes to our faith in a Savior God who has always worked in strange and supernatural ways.

We should take care not to become so modern that unseen, strange realities have no bearing on how we think and feel and live.

The nature of evil.

Count Dracula is cruel toward others, murderous, hateful, vengeful, cold, proud, selfish, and basically completely void of love for anyone but himself. He is humanity at its worst, most fallen. Not only does him simply love only himself, his heart is so hard that he is incapable of treasuring anything but himself.

In him, we see so much of the awful potential that humanity has to be evil (i.e. – total depravity).

Amity and the nature of goodness.

In our heroes (Jonathan Harker, Mina Murray, Dr. Seward, Dr. Van Helsing, etc.), there is a simple honesty and goodness. They are diligent. They are afraid yet fight on, exemplifying courage and perseverance in the face of great evil. They are, it seems, outmatched against Count Dracula, but they keep at their quest no matter how bleak it looks or how much they’ve lost already because if not they cannot or will not fight Dracula, who will? They are quick to see the value in each other, quick the love each other. They are kind and love what is good.

In them we see all the best potential that humanity has for good (i.e. – ways people image Christ, like we were designed to).

[The Portrayal of Men, Women, and Marriage]

In general, the portrayal in the heroes of masculinity, femininity, and marriage was so wonderful and refreshing.

Mina Murray was smart and resourceful, and while sometimes the writing was over the top with surprise at how smart and resourceful Mina was, it was a fitting representation of women. She was kind and gracious, clever and helpful, brave and tenacious.

Also, all the dudes in this book were so amazing as men. They saw it as their responsibility to help and protect Mina and the other women at whatever cost to themselves. They were gallant and devoted as well as intelligent and strong. Where gentleness was needed, they were gentle. Where ferocity was needed, they were fierce. They, simply put, were good men.

Also, a certain couple gets married in the middle of the book, and their relationship and Stoker’s portrayal of marriage and the roles in marriage is just so beautiful to me.

[The Slow Burn Plot]

I just loved the plot for this. And I don’t usually love plots because I’m a character first person…. but Stoker was masterful.

In the first act, he attaches us primarily to one character (Jonathan Harkar, aka: my favorite) and then deploys an unexpected (at least to me) twist, veering off in a new direction while the reader reels from a mid-book cliffhanger.

Then, begins the slow burn.

The reader knows all along the way that something bad is happening, that the things that are being written—every ship log, diary entry, etc.—are relating to Count Dracula in some way, but the reader isn’t always aware how it is related.

There’s just this rising tide of dread that grows and grows as tension tightens and tightens around each arc of the plot.

It’s especially excruciating since the reader knows about Count Dracula, but the heroes don’t at first. Every little thing that’s a red flag or piece of foreshadowing for the reader just goes over the heads of our heroes at first because they have no idea what they’ve gotten into.

To me, it was so well done that I hope to write such suspenseful fiction one day.

[Unsettling/Objectionable Content]

Dracula is still the father of all vampire fiction (and some horror fiction too), so I cannot not mention that there were some things that unsettled me and stunt my recommendation when it comes to younger readers.

Generally, it’s a surprisingly bloodless book (considering these are vampires, people), but there are a few scenes where the violence and gore was unsettling to me. Also, there was a weird and unsettling sensuality in the way vampires were portrayed in some scenes.

However, I found these scenes/this content few and far between and not troubling to the degree that I can’t enjoy the story as a whole.

[To Wrap It Up]

Excuse me while I go write a ton of Dracula fan fiction and rave about how freaking amazing Jonathan Harker is.

(Seriously, though, if I ever were to write a Victorian era novel [or something steampunk-ish] it would be Dracula inspired. And if I ever were to write anything involving vampires, it would basically be a Dracula retelling. And also the main character is going to based off of Jonathan Harker. Just so you’re all warned.)

Have you ever read Dracula? What did you think?

With love,

Rosalie

p.s. – Let me just say that I’m so happy that I get to post on Penprints about persevering in the power of Jesus one week, curate a ridiculous collection of gifs about how to maximize bookstore enjoyment another week, and then turn around and share some thoughts on Dracula. All on the same blog.

Hopefully none of you have whiplash from such topic changes, but if you do, I will quote Lego Batman to you.

lego batman 2.gif

Mwahahaha (I’m done now I promise).

7 Steps to Maximum Bookstore Enjoyment

Today, I am going to a bookstore.

I haven’t been to a bookstore since November 2018, which in bookworm years is like half an eternity.

I’m very excited and have been planning this bookstore trip for about two weeks now. The nearest bookstore is about 35 minutes away, which is just far enough that strategery must be deployed for Maximum Bookstore Enjoyment.

Today, I’m sharing my wisdom on Bookstore Ventures. Listen up, kids.

7 steps bookstore enjoyment.jpg

Step One: Carve out a good chunk of time (aka: release yourself of all responsibility for at least 7.5 hours). 

Take the day off from work. Clear your schedule. Make it clear to your loved ones that if they need anything, you’ll be at the bookstore and thus otherwise engaged for quite some time.

ron swanson 2.gif

People will be sad that you are unreachable during your Bookstore Venture. That’s okay. They’ll live.

Step Two: Conduct reconnaissance and gather provisions. 

It’s important to know what sort of bookstore you’re walking into and what amenities the surrounding area has to offer.

feel like a spy 1.gif

For instance, you’ll likely need some coffee, so make sure there’s either a coffee shop inside the bookstore or that there’s a coffee shop on the way too the bookstore. (Also, I should warn you that a bookstore without a coffee shop should be regarded as Shady.)

If there are no proper eateries within thirty seconds of the bookstore, pack snacks.

provisions 1.gif

Step Three: Select the proper wardrobe.

You can’t go to a bookstore wearing just anything.

edna mode 6

You need something comfy, stylish, and possibly bookish. If you have bookish merch of any kind, this where you break it out. Wear the Out of Print t-shirt, the Storiarts headband (anybody want to buy me a Dracula headband?), the bookworm socks. Or, go the fandom route.

You’re going home to the bookstore. Such an occasion requires the proper attire.

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Step Four: Leave the dead weight non-bookish people at home.

If you are a mother and have offspring, leave the offspring at home.

It’s also best if you leave family and/or friends at home who may in any way try to rush the Bookstore Venture.

If they are not a fellow Bookworm, they will only detract from the Venture by….

a) complaining about your mood, attire, etc.

Bookworm:

rafiki 7.gif

Person:

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b) getting bored in the bookstore

c) asking if you’re almost done

d) sighing

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e) constantly checking their phone

f) sighing more

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g) asking, “Don’t you already have enough books?”

h) ect. 

Step Five: Locate and take pictures of all the books you already own by authors you already know and love and post them on Instagram.

If I need to explain this why this step is imperative, you clearly have not been exposed to the #bookstagram community, and the very nature of your Bookworm-ness has been called into question.

Step Six: Angst over which books you’re going to purchase.

You know the feeling. There are so many good options and too little money and shelf space.

You take books off the shelves only to reshelve them only to take them off again. You read blurbs and first chapters and stare at covers and recheck your bank account and reshelve the books.

You don’t know which books to buy, which ones are the most essential to your towering TBR pile.

Buy the box set? Or get the YA retelling?

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Or choose the book you’d never heard of before today but has a beautiful cover and a mouth-watering blurb?

And what about that special edition of your favorite classic?

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Or go with the hardcover that you have to take out a mortgage to buy, but my goodness it’s gorgeous?

How can you possibly choose?

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Step Seven: Buy some books. Engage in some “I just bought books” merrymaking. Die happy.

ron swanson 8

stranger things 1

chris traeger 4

That’s how it’s done.

With love,

Rosalie

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p.s. – today is Katie Grace’s birthday!! Happy Birthday, Katie!!

p.p.s. – that Avengers: Endgame trailer, amiright?

p.p.p.s. – I clearly spent more time looking for gifs than I did writing this post.