The 2019 Penprints Flash Fiction Dash Wrap-up

Today is the wrap-up for the 2019 Penprints Flash Fiction Dash!

We had 39 sign-ups this year, but sadly 17 of our writers were unable to complete the challenge due to lots of crazy life stuff (heck, I wasn’t even technically participating in the challenge and had a hard time tending to it this year).

But we still have over twenty stories in eight different genres (I’m using that term loosely, haha), and they’re all gathered here for your reading pleasure!

Disclaimer: I own none of the prompts.

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[Contemporary]

[prompt: Younger Now by Miley Cyrus]

Gray by Abigayle Claire.

These Moments... by Micaiah Saldaña.

Symphony of Change by Andi L. Gregory.


 

[Urban Fantasy/Magical Realism]

urban fantasy

Monster Mayhem by Anika Walkes (pg-13 content warning).

War by Just B. Jordan.


 

[Fairytale/Folklore]

fairytale

Home Before Dark by Spruce Holly Nogard.

Lisanthus by Emily Jayne.

Moonlit Dances by M.A. Starr.


 

[Sword and Sorcery]

sword and sorcery

The Chosen One by Julian Daventry.

The Burden of Remembrance by Sarah Rodecker.

Ferra by Alina Kanaski.

Remember by R. M. Archer.


 

[Dystopian]

dystopian prompt

Level 1 by Lila Kims (it’s really a light sci-fi story, but shhhhh).

Lupe by Nicholas Jayne (pg-13 content warning).


[Cyberpunk]

[prompt: Arrow by half-alive]

The Hardest Place by Carrie-Anne Thomas.

Between Remembered and Forgotten by T. J. Priest.

The Chainless by J. M. Jablowski.


[Superhero]

superhero prompt

The Inferno by Nicole Dust.

Pirouette by C.O. Bonham.


[Romance]

[prompt: Be Here Long by NEEDTOBREATHE]

Her Hair Is Red by Laura Frances.

Jesus Has a Plan by Farmgirl Fibers and Arts.


And that’s a wrap!

Dashers, keep an eye on your inbox for a debrief email!

Which story was your favorite? Which prompt was your favorite? Should we have another flash fic dash next year?

With love,

Rosalie

The 2019 Penprints Flash Fiction Dash

Well, it’s that time of year again. Time for the annual Penprints Flash Fiction Dash.

pffd open registration

What is the #flashficdash?

Definitions of flash fiction can vary, but for the purposes of this challenge, a piece of flash fiction is a short story 1000 words or less. Writing a complete story–something with a beginning, a middle, and an end–with so few words can be difficult, but it is always rewarding.

The Penprints Flash Fiction Dash is a challenge, not a contest.

Every year it’s about the same thing: getting people writing, not picking which story is best. There will be no ranking who’s stories were better than whose, or anything like that.

My hope is that this will challenge you to venture out into a new story, have fun with writing, and exercise the art of telling a story in a very small wordcount.

How it works:

You fill out the registration form, I send you a prompt, you write a flash fiction based on that prompt, you post your story on your blog (optional), send your story to me by June 7, 2019, and I’ll include your story in the giant wrap-up post on June 11, 2019.

How 2019’s Dash Is Different:

In the past, I selected an individual prompt for every single writer who signed up based on the genre info they gave in their registration form.

T’will not be so in 2019.

There are 10 different categories:

  • Contemporary
  • Urban fantasy/magical realism
  • Thriller/suspense
  • Fairytale/folklore/light fantasy
  • Dystopian
  • Gothic
  • Cyberpunk
  • Sword and sorcery/medieval fantasy
  • Superhero
  • Romance

These categories are by no means meant to cover every genre of fiction; I’ve selected the ten most popular categories out of past flash fiction dashes.

When you register, you select one category. Each category will be given one prompt. So if seven different writers select “Dystopian” as their preferred category, those seven will receive the same prompt.

Why we’re going to try it this way: 

  1. Past dashers have asked for model like this.
  2. Each person’s creativity and imagination is different, and I’m super jazzed to see what different personalities and minds do with the same prompt.
  3. I don’t have time to hunt down 40 or more individualized prompts.

Also, this year there are three different types of prompts that will go out: picture, song, or opening line.

However, it’s a secret which categories will get which type of prompt. *dun dun dunnnnn* So you won’t really know which kind of prompt you’re working off of until your prompt arrives in your inbox.

We’ll see if this adds an element of mystery, fun, and thrill or if it’s just annoying.

Why you should totally be interested:

pffd 19 promo.jpgI’ve taken the liberty of compiling a Very Convincing And Not At All Copy And Pasted From Last Year’s list of reasons why you need to sign up right away.

  • I say so (as always, this is the most compelling reason on the list).
  • If you’re in a writing slump, this is a great way to get your creativity rolling again.
  • Writing a story in a 1000 words or less will grow you as a writer (even if you’ve written hundreds of flash fictions).
  • You and your writing can get a little more exposure.
  • I want to read your stories!
  • It’s. so. much. fun!

General guidelines:

  • Your story must be 1000 words or less.
  • Stories with excessive violence, sexual content, or profanity will not be included in the wrap-up post.
  • In order for your story to be included in the wrap-up post, it must be sent back to me by 11:59 pm on June 7, 2019.
  • You must have unfettered fun.

When you post your story on your blog:

Include your prompt, mention that you’re taking part of the Penprints Flash Fiction Dash, and share your story. And then send me the link to it by June 7!

If you don’t have a blog:

Please participate! You don’t have to have a blog in order to participate. You can still sign up, get a prompt, write a story, send it back to me, and be featured in the wrap-up post.

If you don’t have a blog or won’t be posting your story on your blog, send your story to me as a Word or Google Doc (please do not paste your story in the body of the email), and I will convert it into a clickable PDF to share in the wrap-up post.

Dates to know:

registration opens 1May 7, 2019 – registration opens.

May 21, 2019 – registration closes.

May 22, 2019 – prompts go out.

June 7, 2019 – stories due back to me if you want them included in the wrap-up post.

June 11, 2019 – the 2019 wrap-up post will go live with all the participating stories.

Links to have:

The Instagram account.

The 2017 Penprints Flash Fiction Dash Wrap-up.

The 2018 Penprints Flash Fiction Dash Wrap-up.

– > The 2019 registration form. < – 

Just B. Jordan on Writing Flash Fiction.

In Defense of Short Fiction.

13 Tips for Writing Flash Fiction.

That’s it!

I’m so excited to see what happens with the little changes this year, and I can’t wait to read the stories you guys come up with!

Be sure the share this post with anyone you think would like to participate! And let me know if you have any questions in the comments below!

With love,

Rosalie

p.s. – hashtags to use are: #flashficdash and #flashficdash19

 

The 2018 Penprints Flash Fiction Dash WRAP-UP

Well, kids, today is the day.

Today is the giant wrap-up for the 2018 Penprints Flash Fiction Dash.

the 2018 penprints flash fiction dash the giant wrap-up post.jpg

Before we get to the stories themselves, I just want to say a few things (because I’m charge and can do as I please, mwahahaha).

I wasn’t going to do a flash fiction dash this year just because of the time it takes, but almost last minute, I decided to launch it because it had been so much fun last year. And I decided to give it an Instagram so that I could give the stories another spotlight and hopefully be able to interact with all you lovely people on another level.

Guys, you made it so worth it.

It was so fun tracking the hashtags and seeing people work on their stories, but when the stories actually started to come in…. man, you guys blew my mind.

So much imagination and creativity and talent has gone into each of these stories, so many unique angles on the prompts that I never dreamed of, and I feel so privileged and humbled to be able to interact with these writers and compile these stories.

I know I sound like a broken record because I keep telling people “I love what you did with the prompt”, but it’s just the way it is–they did amazing things with the prompts.

So, without any more of my rambling, let’s go on 25 different adventures. Click the prompt to read the story.

Disclaimer: neither I nor any of these writers own any of these pictures; they were found in the depths of Pinterest.

[Science Fiction]

To the Stars Who Listen by Athelas Hale.

athelas-hale-jpg.jpg

Human Error by Faith Song.

faith-song-line-jpg.jpg

Tell the Wolves I’m Home by Moya Tobey.

moya-tobey-jpg.jpg

[Fantasy]

Sun Eater by Just B. Jordan

just-b-jordan-jpg

The Painting by Alina.

alina prompt jpg.jpg

Dragonborne by A.K.R. Scott.

a-k-r-scott-jpg.jpg

The Last of the Lightning Bearers by Sarah Rodecker.

 

sarah-rodecker-jpg.jpg

Rimewhittling by Spruce Holly Nogard.

spruce-holly-nogard-jpg.jpg

The Deal Is Off by Julian Daventry.

julian-daventry-jpg.jpg

Song of the Wind by Emily Jayne.

emily-jayne jpg.jpg

Letters from the Banned by M.

m-jpg

Ambush by Katherine M.

katherine-m-jpg

The Pond by Melinda Wagner.

melinda-wagner-jpg

[Contemporary]

The Day We Say Goodbye by Micaiah Saldana.

micaiah-saldana-jpg.jpg

The Decision by Andi L. Gregory.

andi-l-gregory-jpg.jpg

Different Storms by J.M. Jablowski

j-m-jablowski-jpg.jpg

Survival by Abigayle Claire.

abigayle-claire-jpg

A Change of Heart by Anika Walkes

anika-walkes-jpg.jpg

[Historical]

To See by Tapar – through the desert.
tapar-through-the-desert-jpg

Between the Raindrops by Amanda Harder.

amanda-harder-jpg

[Other]

[aka: the category for stories that I can’t figure out what genre they belong; all I know is that they’re mostly speculative]

Replaced by Aebli.

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All for a Sip of Hot Chocolate by True Shaw.

true-shaw-jpg.jpg

Black + White by Lisa Elis.

lisa-elis-jpg.jpg

Ribs by Heid Melo (and she’s a girl after my own heart–she has a playlist for it).

heidi-melo-jpg.jpg

Not for Me by Michael A. Blaylock.

michael-blaylock-jpg.jpg


And that’s the end of it.

The 2018 Penprints Flash Fiction Dash has come to a close. Here’s a huge thank you to everyone who participated, and a huge thank you to everyone who’s stopped in to read these fantastic stories.

What story was your favorite? What prompt was your favorite?

With love,

Rosalie

P.S. – For news of the 2019 Penprints Flash Fiction Dash, keep a weather eye on the Instagram account.

P.P.S. – The July memo for High Command (aka: my swanky newsletter) is slotted to go out this Friday; sign up now to receive the secret updates.

P.P.P.S. – Flash fiction dashers! Also be on the lookout for a debrief email about this year’s challenge!

The 2018 Penprints Flash Fiction Dash [sign-ups are open]

It’s that time of year again. Time to announce the 2018 Penprints Flash Fiction Dash.

This is where you get allllll the details.

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A brief explanation of flash fiction:

Definitions of “flash fiction” vary, but for the purpose of this challenge flash fictions are stories that are 1000 words or less. They are not always easy to write, but they are often rewarding.

I’ll share some helpful posts about flash fiction at the end of this post.

The general gist of how this works:

If you want to give flash fiction a go (or if you’re already a flash fiction veteran), it all starts with you signing up here. Using the information you give me in your sign-up (genre and prompt preferences), I will pick out a prompt for you (usually from the depths of Pinterest) and send it to you.

Then, you have just over three weeks to draft and edit a flash fiction using the prompt as a springboard. If you want, you can post your story on your blog.

After you’re finished with editing and such, you send me your story (or a link to your story), and I compile ALLLLLLLLL the flash fictions written into one final wrap-up post so that everyone can know where to find them all.

Same as last year–it’s a challenge, not a contest.

This is about getting people writing, not about picking which story is best. There will be no ranking who’s stories were better than whose, or anything like that.

My hope is that this will challenge you to venture out into a new story, have fun with writing, and exercise the art of telling a story in a very small wordcount.

Why you should totally be interested:

I’ve taken the liberty of compiling a Very Convincing And Not At All Like Last Year’s list of reasons why you need to sign up right away.

  • I say so (as always, this is the most compelling reason on the list).
  • If you’re in a writing slump, this is a great way to get your creativity rolling again.
  • Writing a story in a 1000 words or less will grow you as a writer (even if you’ve written hundreds of flash fictions).
  • You and your writing can get a little more exposure.
  • I want to read your stories!
  • It’s. so. much. fun!

(Okay, so these are basically the same reasons I laid out for you guys last year, but whatevs.)

Some general guidelines:

  • Your story must be 1000 words or less.
  • Stories with excessive violence, sexual content, or profanity will not be included in the wrap-up post.
  • In order for your story to be included in the wrap-up post, it must be sent back to me by 11:59 pm on June 18, 2018.
  • You must have unfettered fun.

When you post your story on your blog:

Include your prompt, mention that you’re taking part of the Penprints Flash Fiction Dash, and share your story. And then send me the link to it by June 18!

If you don’t have a blog:

Please participate! You don’t have to have a blog in order to participate. You can still sign up, get a prompt, write a story, send it back to me, and be featured in the wrap-up post.

If you don’t have a blog or won’t be posting your story on your blog, send your story to me as a Word or Google Doc (please do not paste your story in the body of the email), and I will convert it into a clickable PDF to share in the wrap-up post.

All the need-to-know dates:

Sign-ups are open April 30, 2018 – May 21, 2018.

Prompts will be sent out by May 25, 2018.

Writers have until 11:59 pm on June 18, 2018 (over three weeks) to write their stories and send them to me.

The wrap-up post will go live on June 25, 2018.

All the extra stuff:

The Penprints Flash Fiction Dash is now on Instagram. Updates on the challenge will be shared there as well as some of last year’s stories. AND all of this year’s stories will be highlighted via Instagram in the few months following the close of the challenge because if we have more stories than we did last year, it will be a lot to wade through in one wrap-up post (that was a super long, confusing sentence, but here we are).

PFFD 18 black letters, transparent background.jpg

the challenge button on a transparent background

PFFD 18 white letters, BLACK background

the challenge button

i'm writing a story for.jpg

#flashficdash

The official hashtag to use on your social medias is: #flashficdash.

Other posts that might be helpful:

Just B. Jordan on Writing Flash Fiction

In Defense of Short Fiction

The Penprints Flash Fiction Dash [the giant wrap-up post] (from 2017)

13 Tips for Writing Flash Fiction

How to Write Flash Fiction with Ben Wolf


I think that’s everything! If you have any questions whatsoever, drop them in the comments!

Did you take the challenge in 2017? Will you take the challenge 2018??

With love,

Rosalie

The Penprints Flash Fiction Dash [the giant wrap-up post]

The time has come to wrap up the very first ever Penprints Flash Fiction Dash (refer back to this post if you don’t know what I’m talking about)!

There were 44 initial sign ups, 44 prompts went out, and 26 stories came back! My mind = so blown by how excited people got about this challenge and by the uniqueness of each story submitted.

wrap up post.jpg

How this wrap-up works:

All the stories are linked to the prompts below, either via a PDF file or a blot post on the author’s blog.

The stories are divided into very broad genre generalizations (and if I didn’t know what genre to stick it in, it went in “other”), and the last two stories are separate from their genres because they were inspired by song prompts rather than picture prompts (I didn’t want them to get lost in all the pictures, so that’s why I put them at the end in their own little category).

Scroll through this post and click on the picture prompt(s) of the stories you want to read!

NOTE: I do not own any of the following pictures that were used as prompts, and I also don’t own either of the songs used as prompts.

Fantasy.

The Reeducation of Kylee Flintlock by Kat Vinson of Sparks of Ember.

"The Reeducation of Kylee Flintlock" by Kat Vinson

Impossible Love by Adaline Griffiths.

adaline-griffiths-prompt - Copy

Till the Wind Changes by A.K.R. Scott.

akr-scott-prompt

Empty Image by Amanda Cox of Hope Perch.

amanda-cox-prompt

Painted with Light by Kathryn McConaughy of The Language of Writing.

kathryn-mcconaughy-prompt

Under the Surface by Moya Tobey of An Existence Transcribed.

moya-tobey-prompt

White Winds by Emily Jayne.

emily-jayne-prompt

The Confession by Rachel Leroy.

rachel-leroy-prompt

Paper Boat by Melinda Wagner.

melinda-wagner-prompt

Ellusa by Katherine Massengill.

katherine-massengill-prompt

The Dragon in the Mini by Chelsea Hindle.

chelsea-hindle-prompt

Science Fiction.

Strange by Evan Hildreth of Plot Hole Fragments.

evan-hildreth-prompt

Poisoned Time by Kyle Shultz.

kyle-shultz-prompt

So Close by Leah E.

leah-e-prompt

Contemporary.

The Backup by Heather Tabata.

heather-tabata-prompt

Clouds by Alina Kanaski of Ordinary Adventures.

alina-kanaski-prompt

Bird-watching and Other Human Pursuits by Jebraun Clifford.

jebraun-clifford-prompt

Ali Green by Lindsey Tessa of Story Haven.

Other.

Away by Michael Blaylock of Fencing With Ink.

"Away" by Michael Blaylock

Underwater Dance by Nicole Fritz.

nicole-fritz-prompt

Hoofbeats in My Heart by Sarah Rodecker.

sarah-rodecker-prompt

A Delusional Path by Annalia Fiore.

annalia-fiore-prompt

Historical.

Anika Rojkkers’ Experience of 1953 by Laura Danner of Flowers in My Basket.

laura-danner-prompt

Stories from a song prompt.

Collapse of the General Eternal by Just B. Jordan written from “Ghost of a King” by The Grey Havens.

Birdie by Emily Kazmierski written from “Keeping Your Head Up” by Birdie.

The giveaway winner!

All the writers who sent a story back to me (even if they didn’t want it included in this post) were entered to win The Rose Metal Press Field Guide to Writing Flash Fiction as well as a one year subscription to the Splickety Publishing Group magazine of their choice!

So I picked a name out of a hat (okay, I just typed all the names into a random name picker, but that’s just boring sounding), and I need a drumroll people.

*whispers* Are you giving me a drumroll?

The giveaway winner is Laura Danner, author of Anika Rojkker’s Experience of 1953! Woohoo!! Congrats, Laura! I’ll be shooting you an email in a day or two!

And congratulations and thank you to each of you lovely people who signed up and wrote stories!

So, which story was your favorite? Have you fallen in love with flash fiction yet??

With love,

Rosalie

P.S. – yes, yes, this post was supposed to go up yesterday, but I encountered major technical difficulties. Thus, this amazing wrap-up post was delayed a day. :( Trust me, there was much growling and groaning and gnashing of teeth as I tried to trouble shoot the technical hiccups. Updates on delays and post sneak peaks and such can be found on my Facebook page, just so ya know.
P.P.S. – writers who participated in this challenge, keep a weather eye on your inboxes as a debrief email should be arriving within the next couple of days.